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Recommended Reading for Science Fiction

Enclave by Ann Aguirre
In a post-apocalyptic future, fifteen-year-old Deuce, a loyal Huntress, brings back meat while avoiding the Freaks outside her enclave.  When she is partnered with the mysterious outsider, Fade, she begins to see that the strict ways of the elders may be wrong– and dangerous.

Matched by Allyson Condie
All her life, Cassia has never had a choice. The Society dictates everything: when and how to play, where to work, where to live, what to eat and wear, when to die, and most importantly to Cassia as she turns 17, who to marry. (Also check out the sequel Crossed.)

The Line by Teri Hall
After losing her father in the war between the Unified States and Samarik, Rachel and her mother settle for a quiet life working for the aloof Ms. Moore. However, living so close to the “Line” that divides her world from “Away” makes Rachel question her past and her future. (Also check out the sequel Away.)

The Skyship Academy: The Pearl Wars by Nick James
In 2095 when a fifteen-year-old slacker discovers that he has the power to control Pearls, fragments of space debris that are a dying Earth’s most important energy source, government forces work to capture him.

Awaken by Katie Kacvinsky
Because of school violence, terrorism, drugs, etc., all students in Corvallis, OR, in 2060 attend online classes, called Digital School. Virtually all relationships are now digital. Teens visit virtual coffee shops, take virtual runs on the beach, and go out on virtual dates.

Human.4 by Mike Lancaster
Kyle Straker volunteered to be hypnotized at the annual community talent show, expecting the same old lame amateur acts. But when he wakes up, his world will never be the same.

The Declaration by Gemma Malley
In 2140 England, where drugs enable people to live forever and children are illegal, teenaged Anna, an obedient “Surplus” training to become a house servant, discovers that her birth parents are trying to find her.

Cinder by Marissa Meyer
Sci-fi meets fairy tale in this futuristic Cinderella story blending androids, hovercrafts, and netscreens with royalty, a ball, and an evil stepmother.

The Adoration of Jenna Fox by Mary Pearson
In the not-too-distant future, when biotechnological advances have made synthetic bodies and brains possible but illegal, a seventeen-year-old girl, recovering from a serious accident and suffering from memory lapses, learns a startling secret about her existence.

Life As We Knew It by Susan Beth Pfeffer
Through journal entries sixteen-year-old Miranda describes her family’s struggle to survive after a meteor hits the moon, causing worldwide tsunamis, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions. (Also check out The Dead and the Gone, and The World We Live In.)

Glow by Amy Kathleen Ryan
With Earth no longer viable, two pioneer spaceships have been on the road for years and have more than 40 to go before arriving at their goal. The two spaceships are complete habitats, raising crops and families to prepare for colonizing New Earth.

Time Riders by Alex Scarrow
In this rollicking adventure, three teens are plucked from obscurity just before their deaths and offered the chance to join the secretive TimeRiders organization, which was formed to stop rogue time travelers from destroying the world.  (Also check out the sequel Day of the Predator.)

Unwind by Neal Shusterman
In a future world where those between the ages of thirteen and eighteen can have their lives “unwound” and their body parts harvested for use by others, three teens go to extreme lengths to uphold their beliefs–and, perhaps, save their own lives

Ashes, Ashes by Jo Treggiari
In a future Manhattan devastated by environmental catastrophes and epidemics, sixteen-year-old Lucy survives alone until vicious hounds target her and force her to join Aidan and his band, but soon they learn that she is the target of Sweepers, who kidnap and infect people with plague.

Variant by Robison Wells
After years in foster homes, seventeen-year-old Benson Fisher applies to New Mexico’s Maxfield Academy in hopes of securing a brighter future, but instead he finds that the school is a prison and no one is what he or she seems.