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Library History

1924- Mrs. Josephine McKenzie organized the first Itasca Woman’s Club and three years later started a library.  Residents of Itasca donated books and a small rental library began operating out of a one-room building.

1929- The Great Depression forced the library to close. Mrs. McKenzie took the books and offered library services out of her home every afternoon and two evenings a week.

1952- The community formed a library committee to handle the library materials when Mrs. McKenzie’s heath caused her to close her doors.

1953- A free circulating library was set up in the east end of the North School gymnasium.

1955- The library was transferred to a room in the North School basement.

1957- The Itasca Community Library (ICL) was established as a taxing body by a referendum and was forced to move again, this time to the Itasca Village Hall Annex. 

1961- The ICL moved to its sixth home, a former post office building.

1973- The ICL received its first official library building.  This building was a one story structure of brick and concrete designed to house up to 43,000 volumes.  As the ICL collections grew, the Library Board of Trustees of the ICL found it necessary to request public approval of a building bond issue, which resulted in the construction of an 8,938 square foot library building. 

1993- The community approved a second referendum request to enlarge that existing structure to a 27,000 square foot library.

2001- A staircase and public washrooms, on the mezzanine level, were built in order to begin utilizing the mezzanine space.

2003- The Friends of the Library Group was established in order to plan for the future.

2005- An Itasca Community Library Endowment Fund was started.

2007- The adult non-fiction collections were moved to the mezzanine area, a youth services programming room was built, and a computer lab was installed.   

2008- A referendum asking for public approval to repair the library building’s excessive water and mold damage was passed.

2009- The ICL received the Itasca archive collections from the Itasca Historical Society and began the process of organizing and digitizing it.  Today, the ICL is home to an Itasca Gallery which showcases local artwork and historical photo collections.